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People or Process Reliant

During my comparatively short career I had the chance to work in a start-up business, a medium size enterprise and a large corporation. Needless to say that there are many obvious differences among the three, but one particular aspect that I would like to draw our attention to today is the process of enterprise growth.

At first we need to ask ourselves what the thing that we call an organisation is. Unfortunately, the sheer volume of information related to organisations makes defining its essence a daunting task, even with Google’s help. For the purpose of this article we will construct our own definition, which will draw upon Culture Management and Knowledge Management concepts:

An organisation is a set of behavioural patterns, which are influenced by individual employees, codified norms and historical behavioural patterns.

Four important concepts are tied together in this definition:

Firstly, we assume that it is through behaviour of its employees that an organisation exhibits its presence.  It’s common to see definitions that emphasise on the culture or brand as the essence of the organisation. However, these definitions are ill-suited for our purpose because they don’t go far enough. While causes that elicit employee behaviour are multiple, our proposition is that behaviour is the ultimate variable affected. Culture is important, it affects behaviour,  but so does a policy manual.

Subsequently, we propose three sources of influence that do affect behaviour: individual employees, codified norms and historical behavioural patterns. Individual employees bring their own experiences, habits and initiative into the organisation. Whether or not their habits become part of the organisation depends on a variety of factors, which will be discussed later. Codified norms are another source of influence and refer to actual procedures set out in various policy manuals.

Lastly, historical behavioural patterns consist of how the organisation and people in it traditionally behaved (this portion often described as culture) and significant “out of norm occurrences”. For example, let’s say fraud occurred in the organisation and people in the organisation were so shocked as to become extra vigilant, then the organisational culture would be “anti-fraud”, yet past fraudulent behaviour had significant influence.

Once our framework for analysis is set up, we can ask ourselves how a young company differs from a mature one.

In my experience, young companies are (surprise!) people driven. With little codified norms and virtually no historical behavioural patterns to restrict individual creativity, employees and especially founders are able to set a foundation, good or bad, for organisational behaviour. Mature organisations, on the other hand, have processes and policies in place to restrict influence of individuals. Specific employees are not loger able to do what they like, but need to meet minimum explicit or implicit performance standards, or are restricted in the ways they can perform their functions. On one hand, such development is often critiqued since large organisations are notoriously slow in adapting to change, on the other hand, by codifying behavioural norms, managers can objectively evaluate and adjust organisational behavioural patterns.   The most peculiar situation happens in growing organisations, where the need for explicit standards and instructions is clearly visible due to increased efforts spent by employees in coordinating activities, yet each position within the organisation is attached to a particular individual and presents itself to managers as a vague black box, “we sort of know what this employee does, but aren’t sure how he does it”.

Anyone wishes to share their experiences in start-up, growing, or mature organisations?

Alex

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